Tuesday, 3 April 2012

The Beatles and the search for the light

Beatles illuminati


The Amamzon description for my book - The Sgt Pepper Code - reads "What is the Sgt Pepper Code? Did the Beatles have access to hidden knowledge about the origins of Christianity? Were they taught the secrets of the Freemasons? Had they discovered the history of the Knights Templars or the occult connections of the Illuminati to whom they became exposed? Does the inclusion of Aleister Crowley on the record sleeve reveal their satanic black magic – or black magick - roots?" I have come across an article from the British publication, now long defunct, the Record Mirror that provides a clue, perhaps, to the Beatles wishing to use masonic or illuminati symbolism a long time prior to Sgt. Pepper.

According to the article of October 10th 1964, the cover of Beatles For Sale was originally going to show the boys with lit matches under their chins standing under the Arc de Triomphe in Paris.
Beatles Illuminati

The Arc de Triomphe is a building with established masonic links. The monument is home to the tomb of the unknown soldier and this is marked by the ‘eternal flame’ monument. An eternal flame also burns next to the grave of President John F. Kennedy.


This is also reminiscent of the torch that is held by the Statue of Liberty in New York, a monument that was donated by French freemasons to their American brethren. It is believed the Statue of Liberty is holding the Masonic “Torch of Enlightenment,” which represents the Sun, and of course the word Illuminati means “to bare light,” precisely what the Beatles are doing in the photo above.

The Statue of Liberty masonic dedication


The Arc de Triomphe is placed at the centre of a circle from which 12 roads go out across Paris. On the road circle around the Arc de Triomphe are 12 points on the road making a 12-pointed star. 



The following information from Wikipedia further demonstrates the links between the Arc de Triomphe and Freemasonry.

Freemasons and the Paris Commune
During the 19th century, French Freemasonry became increasingly involved in politics. According to Ernest Belfort Bax, Freemasons were responsible for the last serious attempt at conciliation between Versailles and the Commune on 21 April 1870. They were received coldly by Adolphe Thiers, who assured them that, though Paris was given over to destruction and slaughter, the law should be enforced, and he kept his word. A few days after they decided, in a public meeting, to plant their banner on the ramparts and throw in their lot with the Commune. On the 29th, accordingly, 10,000 of the brethren met (55 lodges being represented), and marched to the Hôtel de Ville, headed by the Grand Masters in full insignia and the banners of the lodges. Amongst them the new banner of Vincennes was conspicuous, bearing the inscription in red letters on a white ground, “Love one another.” A balloon was then sent up, which let fall at intervals, outside Paris, a manifesto of the Freemasons. The procession then wended its way through the boulevards and the Champs Elysées to the Arc de Triomphe, where the banners were planted at various points along the ramparts. On seeing the white flag on the Porte Maillot the Versaillese ceased firing, and the commander, himself a Freemason, received a deputation of brethren, and suggested a final appeal to Versailles, which was agreed to. 

This reminded me of John and Yoko’s first art exhibition at the Robert Fraser Gallery at 69 Duke Street, London. The exhibition's full title was You Are Here (To Yoko from John Lennon, With Love). Also in attendance were various guests, reporters, and Apple's publicist Derek Taylor. Lennon and Ono wore white, to match the white gallery walls and many of the exhibits.

John and Yoko's exhibition at the Robert Fraser Gallery

At the launch ceremony Lennon and Ono released 365 white helium-filled balloons over London. Lennon proclaimed "I declare these balloons high". Attached to each was a printed card with the words "You are here" on one side, and "Write to John Lennon, c/o The Robert Fraser Gallery, 69 Duke Street, London W1" on the other.

Many of who returned the cards received a letter signed by Lennon, which read: "Dear Friend, Thank you very much for writing and sending me my balloon back. I'm sending you a badge just to remind you that you are here. Love, John Lennon."




UPDATE:For more information please read my book The Sgt Pepper Code